Working for Smart Growth:
More Livable Places and Open Spaces

 

Climate and Energy

There is growing recognition, in New Jersey and across the world, that global warming is a serious problem that will require action in the coming years and decades. Add to this the recent spike in fuel prices and more and more people are talking seriously about hybrid cars, renewable energy, green building technology and other ways to reduce greenhouse gases and conserve energy. There is one crucial piece of the puzzle, however, that is often omitted from this conversation: the role of land use in influencing carbon emissions.

Land use—the decisions we make about where and how to develop—has a profound and lasting effect on our greenhouse gas emissions and energy use. And unlike cars or appliances, which can be replaced every few years if a newer, more efficient model comes along, the decisions we make about how to develop, and the impacts these decisions have on climate and energy, will be with us for generations. Poor land-use decisions not only lead to poor outcomes today, but they also limit our ability to reduce these impacts far into the future.

Future Facts
Sea Bright 2050 plus 1 percent storm
Preparing for the Next Sandy Requires Facing Hard Facts

We need to begin the difficult conversation about how to accommodate rising sea levels and future severe storms, if we’re going to be ready for the next Sandy.

Waterfront South Rain Garden Park
Water Infrastructure Funds: An Opportunity To Make Communities More Resilient

The New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust’s plan for its revolving funds must be improved if the funds are to enhance resilience to extreme weather.

U.S. Air Force photo of Sandy damage to the Jersey Shore.
New Jersey Future Partners With Lincoln Institute To Host Resiliency Symposium

Event will focus on concrete steps that are being taken post-Hurricane Sandy to plan, pay for and implement resiliency measures on the ground.

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New Jersey Should Re-Join Greenhouse Gas Initiative

New Jersey Future provided comments strongly supporting the state’s continued membership in the Northeast Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative as a way to generate funds for energy conservation and alternatives.

An energy resiliency bank would enable financing of upgrades to critical water and wastewater infrastructure to enable them to withstand future severe weather.
Energy Resiliency Bank Proposal: Right Concept, but Needs Detail To Protect Against Flooding

New Jersey Future strongly supports the proposed Energy Resiliency Bank, but recommends the current guide include more specifics if it is to meet its intended goals.

Articles and Stories
Sandy aerial view slideshow
What’s Next After Rebuilding? Making Resilience Happen

An afternoon symposium Oct. 30, 2014, in conjunction with the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, focuses on how to advance, and pay for, increased resilience in the wake of Superstorm Sandy. Approved for 2 AICP CM credits.

Draft 2014 New Jersey Hazard Mitigation Plan Available for Comment

March 11, 2014 — New Jerseyans concerned about the state’s ability to withstand future storms now have the opportunity to weigh in on a document that could lay the groundwork for a more resilient future. Comments will be accepted for a one-month period ending April 11.

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Sandy One Year Later: Looking to the Future

A conference on the first anniversary of Superstorm Sandy examines the rebuilding progress made to date, and the work still left to do.

An Evening at the Shore

A gathering on the anniversary of Superstorm Sandy to connect with others involved in rebuilding the Jersey Shore.

Preparing for the Next Sandy Requires Facing Hard Facts

Oct. 28, 2014 — Two years after the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy, many of New Jersey’s coastal communities continue to struggle with recovery and rebuilding efforts. The highest community priority is to get people back into their homes, re-establish business operations and return to life as close to normal as possible. The elected officials who have led these efforts are hardworking heroes. But it’s also clear that recovery decisions made without a clear understanding of future risks can move people back into harm’s way, build infrastructure that will be damaged again, and waste taxpayer dollars.

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Reports, Presentations and Testimony

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