Working for Smart Growth:
More Livable Places and Open Spaces

 

Sprawl

The kind of suburban residential and commercial development that has been prevalent in New Jersey over the last 40 years is referred to as sprawl.

It is characterized by: development of formerly “green” land; separated uses (homes, shopping, employment and recreational facilities far away from each other); low density single-family homes on large lots; dependence on cars to get around; and little public open space.

Sprawl development has turned out to be harmful to the state and its residents. Automobile-related pollution, loss of farmland, increased rates of obesity and increasingly unsustainable property tax rates are just some of the effects of sprawl development.

Smart-growth development, by contrast, seeks to direct growth to areas where infrastructure already exists, where higher densities make the provision of public services less expensive, and where different kinds of uses can be located near each other for easy access by residents, where the same amount of land produces higher tax revenues, and where transportation options other than cars are readily available.

Future Facts
florio_james-j-150x150
Fourth Regional Plan Conference Themes: Revitalization, Technology, Affordability and Access

The New Jersey Conference on the Fourth Regional Plan highlighted issues of affordability, transportation, technology, access to opportunity, and climate change.

Source: Rowan University GeoLab
New County Population Estimates: Older Places Continue Their Revival

The new Census estimates show a continuation of county population trends: Older, already-built places see growth, and exurban counties see population losses.

Places To Age
Report: Many Older New Jerseyans Don’t Live in Aging-Friendly Places

A new report identifies a significant mismatch in New Jersey between where large numbers of older residents live and which municipalities are most prepared, from a land-use perspective, to accommodate them.

Source: Rowan University GeoLab
Sprawl Isn’t Dead, It’s Just Hibernating

The suburban places that used to lead the list of fastest-growing municipalities in New Jersey are still growing, just more slowly.

Pop trends fig 1
Is Redevelopment the ‘New Normal?’

New population migration data show that, at least for the moment, New Jersey’s pattern of sprawl development has slowed significantly.

Articles and Stories
robbinsville pic2-web
Non-Contiguous Cluster Development

Two webinars examining how communities can implement the state’s updated non-contiguous cluster development law to steer growth to areas that make sense and preserve the open land that would otherwise have been needed to accommodate that growth. Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013, at noon and Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013, at noon.

Places To Age
Creating Places To Age in New Jersey

There is a significant mismatch in New Jersey between where large numbers of older residents live and which municipalities are most prepared to accommodate them. This report matches every municipality against four age-friendliness indicators, and analyzes the degree to which New Jersey’s older residents are living in places that, from a land-use perspective, are not prepared to accommodate their changing needs. January 2014.

Rendering of Woolwich Township TDR
Transfer of Development Rights and Clustering

Trransfer of development rights (TDR) and clustering are tools that municipalities in New Jersey can use to direct growth and preserve open space.

An example of clustered development
Noncontiguous Cluster Development

An overview of cluster development in New Jersey, along with relevant resources.

faq_image
Smart Growth FAQ

Some frequently-asked questions about how smart growth would affect New Jersey’s future development, including how it affects traffic, taxes, and land preservation.

See all Future Facts and Articles in this category »
 

Reports, Presentations and Testimony

© New Jersey Future, 137 West Hanover Street • Trenton, NJ 08618 • Phone: 609-393-0008 • Fax: 609-393-1189