Working for Smart Growth:
More Livable Places and Open Spaces

 

State Planning

Where and how we grow is fundamental to New Jersey’s economic prosperity, environmental health and social equity.

In 1986, recognizing the critical role the state must play in directing future growth and aligning resources accordingly, New Jersey adopted the State Planning Act — a groundbreaking effort to coordinate land-use planning among state agencies and different levels of government.  The act mandated the creation of the State Development and Redevelopment Plan (the “State Plan”), as well as the formation of the State Planning Commission and its staff, now housed at the Office of Planning Advocacy in the Department of State.

But 20 years’ experience with state planning has produced mixed results.  The State Plan vision for strong communities and preserved open lands is widely shared and has helped shape development patterns.  But, for a variety of reasons, the Plan has not been fully implemented by either state agencies or municipalities. In response, in early 2011 the Christie administration began a process that culminated in October 2011 in the release of a proposed a new State Plan update called the State Strategic Plan.

See the latest information on the State Strategic Plan, including the latest draft of the Plan, statements from New Jersey Future, press coverage and analysis, and links to upcoming meetings and to state agency implementation steps.

 

Future Facts
Sandy damage -- resiliency
State Hazard Mitigation Plan Should Do More To Address Risk, Integrate With Local Planning

Comments from New Jersey Future and six other organizations call for the state’s draft hazard mitigation plan to be modified to take greater account of climate-based risks, and to integrate more closely with local planning efforts.

Mantoloking Sandy
Timing of Public Comment Period on State Hazard Plan Raises Questions

For the first time, the state requested public input on the draft hazard mitigation plan it must submit. But it opened the comment period only after it had submitted the draft plan.

Seth Pinsky during his keynote at the Redevelopment Forum.
Forum Keynote: Target Investments at Assets, not Companies

New Jersey, and the entire region, can learn from New York’s success how best to invest in economic growth.

Mantoloking Sandy
Draft 2014 New Jersey Hazard Mitigation Plan Available for Comment

For the first time, the state will accept public comment on its newly released draft Hazard Mitigation Plan. All interested parties are encouraged to submit comments.

Sandy hearings
New York State Announces Major Investment in Post-Sandy Community Planning and Implementation

New York’s plan allocates significantly more funding than New Jersey’s to local planning in order to foster comprehensive risk analysis for recovery investments.

Articles and Stories
2014 Smart Growth Award-Winners Announced

April 1, 2014 — Three different types of housing developments; two plans to revitalize fading downtowns; a plan that transformed an industrial riverfront into a premier urban asset; a project that will serve as an anchor of hope to its surrounding community; and a region-wide plan for smart economic growth are all winners of New Jersey Future’s 2014 Smart Growth Awards

Cover slide for livestream
Sandy One Year Later: Looking to the Future

A conference on the first anniversary of Superstorm Sandy examines the rebuilding progress made to date, and the work still left to do.

An Evening at the Shore

A gathering on the anniversary of Superstorm Sandy to connect with others involved in rebuilding the Jersey Shore.

THE EXPLAINER: The State Plan

Oct. 15, 2013 — New Jersey is the most intensively developed state in the country. In 1986, recognizing the critical role the state must play in directing future growth and aligning resources accordingly, New Jersey passed the State Planning Act — a groundbreaking effort to coordinate land-use planning across state agencies and different levels of government.

Paying Attention to New Jersey’s Future

Oct. 18, 2013 — One of the most difficult things successful political leaders must do is to make decisions on behalf of their constituents that might be politically unpopular in the short term, but help to secure a more stable future for generations to come. New Jersey’s current economic stagnation brings this challenge into sharp focus: How can we invest the state’s limited funds strategically in ways that respect immediate budget needs but make the state more prosperous and globally competitive for the long term?

See all Future Facts and Articles in this category »
 

Reports, Presentations and Testimony

© New Jersey Future, 137 West Hanover Street • Trenton, NJ 08618 • Phone: 609-393-0008 • Fax: 609-393-1189