Working for Smart Growth:
More Livable Places and Open Spaces

 

Bicycle and Pedestrian

New Jersey ranks third among states in the percentage of households not owning a vehicle (11.4 percent) and fourth for households owning either one or zero vehicles (45.1 percent).

Yet, since 1970, vehicle miles traveled in New Jersey has increased at a rate four times faster than the state’s population—thanks in large part to the sprawling, auto-dependent development that has prevailed in recent decades. This increase has helped make transportation the largest, and fastest-growing, contributor to the state’s overall carbon footprint.

With these numbers in mind, it makes sense to encourage pedestrian and bicycle behavior by constructing safe roads and routes that accommodate all users. New Jersey Future is an advocate for “Complete Streets,” ensuring that roadways are designed and operated to enable safe access for pedestrians, bikes and the disabled, not just cars.

Riding a bicycle or walking represents an affordable and convenient way to get around, particularly for short distances, and travel by bike or foot can also help people get more active.  Our environment—physical, social and cultural—affects our daily behavior. If we want to encourage healthy choices every day about eating and physical activity, we need environments where such choices are available, affordable and easy.  As New Jersey strives to reduce emissions from the transportation sector in order to meet its greenhouse gas reduction goals, turning these short auto trips into a walk or a bike ride would be a good place to start.

Future Facts
New Jersey’s Approval Rate Sinking With Young Adults

The latest Monmouth Poll Garden State Quality of Life Index shows continuing and growing dissatisfaction among young adults. Census data offer some insights into why.

What Kinds of Places Are Attracting New Jersey’s Out-migrating Millennials?

Analysis of county-to-county migration data shows New Jersey’s out-migrating Millennials are drawn to walkable, mixed-use, transit-accessible population centers. Out-migrants of older generations, by contrast, are more drawn to the outlying parts of metropolitan areas.

New Jersey Becoming Less Dangerous for Pedestrians, but Still Work To Do

Smart Growth America’s new report on pedestrian fatalities shows New Jersey isn’t the most dangerous place to walk, but there is still work to do to make it safer.

A Better Way To Plan for Traffic Effects of New Development

San Jose, California, is using a vehicle-miles-traveled score as a more accurate way than the traditional level-of-service analysis to assess the effectiveness of various traffic mitigation initiatives developers might employ.

New Jersey Future Releases Action Plan for Trenton Transit Center Area

The Trenton Transit Center Strategic Action Plan, prepared by New Jersey Future for the economic-development organization Greater Trenton in partnership with architecture and planning firm Clarke Caton Hintz, lays out strategies and implementation tactics for transforming the station area into a vibrant and dynamic district.

Articles and Stories
Creating Places To Age in New Jersey

There is a significant mismatch in New Jersey between where large numbers of older residents live and which municipalities are most prepared to accommodate them. This report matches every municipality against four age-friendliness indicators, and analyzes the degree to which New Jersey’s older residents are living in places that, from a land-use perspective, are not prepared to accommodate their changing needs. January 2014.

Targeting Transit: Assessing Development Opportunities Around New Jersey’s Transit Stations

New Jersey has 243 transit facilities, ranging from small single-track stations to major multi-line hubs. The unique characteristics of each station, of its immediate neighborhood, and of its surrounding municipality mean that a wide variety of development strategies should be brought to bear in order to maximize each location’s potential. This report shows how data assembled by New Jersey Future can be used to make decisions on how to target various kinds of transit-oriented development efforts. September 2012.

New Jersey Future Creates Database of Development Assets Near Transit Facilities

Sept. 24, 2012: New Jersey Future announced it has assembled a comprehensive database of development-related statistics for the state’s 243 transit stations and their surrounding neighborhoods.

Transforming the State’s Streets

2013 Smart Growth Awards: A comprehensive policy, along with a strong outreach effort, is helping the State of New Jersey and its municipalities re-envision streets in order to consider the needs of all users.

Route 130 Circle Cinnaminson
Filling in the Gaps

An assessment of how comprehensively New Jersey’s Department of Transportation has implemented its Complete Streets Policy. September 2011.

See all Future Facts and Articles in this category »
 

Reports, Presentations and Testimony

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