Working for Smart Growth:
More Livable Places and Open Spaces

 

Demographics & Trends

A key aspect of planning effectively for the future, in terms of where and how to spend money on infrastructure and state government services, is being aware of demographic and macroeconomic trends that may affect the amount of growth New Jersey is likely to experience, our capacity to accommodate it and what physical form the growth is likely to take.

Many of these trends transcend New Jersey’s borders and are beyond the ability of lower levels of government to address.  Ideally, state-level planning should focus on these issues and develop or modify policies to adapt to them.  Trends in household composition (and the resulting demand for different housing-unit types), retail, and the locational preferences of different types of employers will all affect what kinds of buildings need to be built, and where.

Future Facts
The March Toward Walkable Urbanism Continues

New Census municipal population estimates confirm a continuation of the trend toward places with mixed-use centers and a dense local street grid, and in particular toward towns with access to rail transit.

New Jersey Future Resources Highlighted at National Planners’ Convention

Resources developed as part of New Jersey Future’s work with several municipalities on Creating Great Places To Age were featured at the American Planning Association’s annual National Planning Conference in April.

Opportunity Zones Take Another Step Forward

New Jersey’s proposal to designate 169 Census tracts as Opportunity Zones has been approved. Analysis shows they represent the kinds of places where the state would like to direct growth, and where targeted investment can catalyze economic revitalization.

County Population Estimates: Return to the Urban Core Continues

New estimates from the Census Bureau confirm the state’s population shift back to older, more built-out places. Nine counties lost population, and one hit a growth milestone.

Millennials: What Do They Want?

The Millennial Town Hall at the Redevelopment Forum looked at some of the key issues keeping Millennials from starting their careers in New Jersey, including access to transportation options besides cars, and to housing they can afford.

Articles and Stories
Redeveloping the Norm: Identifying and Overcoming Developer Obstacles to Redevelopment in New Jersey

This report identifies strategies to lower both cost and risk in redevelopment projects, as redevelopment increasingly becomes the norm for accommodating growth in New Jersey. January 2016.

Creating Places To Age: Housing Affordability and Aging-Friendly Communities

In this report, New Jersey Future analyzed housing affordability in each New Jersey municipality, to see where households headed by someone 65 or older have high housing costs. The places where housing cost burden is greatest fall into two groups: towns that are expensive for everyone, and towns that are dominated by larger, single-family housing stock. December 2015.

Growing Smart and Water Wise

Development in the Pinelands growth areas has affected water resources and will continue to exert pressures going forward. This report highlights what can be done by municipal, regional and state agencies to minimize their negative impacts. July 2014.

Ripple Effects

This report and related case studies summarize the state of urban water infrastructure in New Jersey and how it affects residents and businesses. May 2014.

New Jersey Future Op-Ed Button
Many Older Residents in New Jersey Live in Aging-Unfriendly Places

March 19, 2014 — A research report recently released by New Jersey Future, Creating Places to Age in New Jersey, evaluates municipalities’ land-use patterns based on how well designed they are to accommodate the changing mobility needs of an aging population.

See all Future Facts and Articles in this category »
 

Reports, Presentations and Testimony

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